I should be grading the giant pile of essays I already have…

teaching-everydayisdifferent:

But instead I have:
Watched cartoons/snuggled
Played with Legos
Eaten at least two apples
Made baked oatmeal muffins while wearing fun aprons
Discussed the awesomeness of Olaf panties

I brought all my pl*nning home so I could be ready for the next three weeks. I convinced myself of this so I c/would leave behind all the grading I have to do. Instead of pl*nning, I have:

watched one more season of SVU,

went to the movies and saw Sin City,

went to dinner with my daughter to celebrate my birthday,

skipped a bbq for “new” teachers because I just couldn’t drag myself out of the house to do it (introvert problems),

pl*nned (ok a bit) my soon to happen presidential scavenger hunt.

blkmagicalgurl:

im so not a club person. i just wanna get hit on and fall in love in a grocery store!!!

(via hipsterenglishteacher)

My voice: S.D. teacher shortage at ‘crisis’ level

midwestmumblings:

ehmeegee:

For as long as I was a student in the Rapid City, South Dakota public school system, I was told that our teachers were paid the least in the nation, so we really shouldn’t be expecting a whole lot from our education. 

To give you some figures of salaries: 

Rapid City Area Schools

First year teacher with a bachelor’s degree: $30,753
Teacher with master’s degree and 5 years experience: $37,554

 Campbell County School District, Wyo. (30 miles from Rapid City)

First year teacher with a bachelor’s degree: $46,000
Teacher with master’s degree and 5 years experience: $55,200

Obviously, we are losing our teachers to other states far within our geographic reach because of the drastic difference in not only starting salaries, but additionally what is being offered for highly-educated and experienced teachers. Because of this, 238 teaching positions, almost 30 percent of the total number of jobs posted in the spring, remained open across the state well past the end of the school year.

This is a major problem. 

I knew I fared much better at Central High School than some of my peers in rural communities across the state. And I’m speaking from a point of privilege here; both of my parents are highly educated and I was able to participate in after-school activities that kept me stimulated, involved, and invested in my future. The violin saved my life and opened up a bright future when it came to applying for scholarships to get out of South Dakota. When I’m asked if I’d ever go back to live in the state the reason my stomach sinks is because I feel strongly that South Dakota is lacking that same bright future. More than half (55%) of students enrolled at Central High School as freshman drop out before graduation. 

Comparatively, the national average of high school students reaching graduation was 80% in 2012, it is not difficult to see how drastically South Dakota students are falling woefully behind. 

The reality is this is not an issue with consequences isolated to the people of South Dakota. As one of the nation’s leading providers in the agricultural and beef industries, we are in danger of losing not only ranchers and farmers but savvy business people who are our hope for maintaining footholds in family-owned operations. They are putting food in your pantries and dinners on your plates and they deserve better educations, or we all suffer. 

I recommend calling the office of Governor Daugaard (605.773.3212and saying something along the lines of:

Hi, Governor Daugaard. As a concerned citizen I am troubled by the lack of financial support being granted to South Dakota public school teachers. As you know, we are losing a significant percentage of qualified teachers to other states with more competitive salaries and are failing to fill hundreds of teaching positions across the state. As a result, I’m worried for the futures of not only thousands of students all around South Dakota, but the drastic affects an uneducated populous will have on a national level. Let’s not have South Dakota teachers be the paid the lowest in the nation for another consecutive year. 

If the phone isn’t for you, you can also submit a form.

Sources:
Argus Leader
Rapid City Journal
US News
Washington Post

As someone who lives in this part of the country (but no, not South Dakota), this is very worrisome to me. 

Coming from South Dakota, this is sad and true. I earned my ed degrees in SD, but left for a job - because as a single mom, there was NO way I could afford to be a teacher without having two part-time jobs. There are other reasons I will never move back, but this is number one. Almost every single teacher I knew was either married (2 incomes) or worked 2 extra jobs, plus put in all the extra hours they could at extracurricular activities - running snack bars, hosting events, etc.

siouxzie-queue:

mi-shellvp:

estasfuera:

“A little bit of Monica in my life,A little bit of Erica by my side,A little bit of Rita is all I need,A little bit of Tina is what I see,A little bit of Sandra in the sun,A little bit of Mary all night long,A little bit of Jessica, here I am…”

If you don’t know this reference, you’re definitely too young for me. 

You know you sang it in your head.
I really sang it out loud

siouxzie-queue:

mi-shellvp:

estasfuera:

“A little bit of Monica in my life,
A little bit of Erica by my side,
A little bit of Rita is all I need,
A little bit of Tina is what I see,
A little bit of Sandra in the sun,
A little bit of Mary all night long,
A little bit of Jessica, here I am…”

If you don’t know this reference, you’re definitely too young for me. 

You know you sang it in your head.

I really sang it out loud

(via adventuresofastudentteacher)

8/24 and 8/25 are Education Dare Days!

teamteachers:

When an Education Dare Day is announced from this blog:

  1. Reblog the announcement!
  2. Ask one question related to education on your tumblr for your followers to answer. Post the responses in one single post later.
  3. Ask at LEAST 2 of the tumblrs in the #education community a question in their ask…

Inequality and Web Search Trends

iamlittlei:

In the hardest places to live – which include large areas of Kentucky, Arkansas, Maine, New Mexico and Oregon – health problems, weight-loss diets, guns, video games and religion are all common search topics. The dark side of religion is of special interest: Antichrist has the second-highest correlation with the hardest places, and searches containing “hell” and “rapture” also make the top 10.

In the easiest places to live, the Canon Elph and other digital cameras dominate the top of the correlation list. Apparently, people in places where life seems good, including Nebraska, Iowa, Wyoming and much of the large metropolitan areas of the Northeast and West Coast, want to record their lives in images.

Beyond cameras, subjects popular in the easiest places include Baby Joggers, Baby Bjorns and baby massage; Skype and Apple devices like the iPod Nano; a piece of workout equipment known as a foam roller; and various foreign destinations (Machu Picchu, New Zealand, Switzerland and Pyeongchang, the South Korean host city for the 2018 Winter Olympics).

Income has stagnated in working-class communities, which helps explain why “selling avon” and “social security checks” correlate with the hardest places from our index. Inequality in health and life expectancy has grown over the same time. And searches on diabetes, lupus, blood pressure, 1,500-calorie diets and “ssi disability” – a reference to the federal benefits program for workers with health problems – also make the list. 

My mother and little brother live right in the middle of those hardest Kentucky places.

This is interesting.

(Source: abbyjean)

Government, AcaDec, and Bulletin Boards

Into full week number two. Things are progressing well. I have my plans for the next few weeks laid out - the curriculum map for the entire trimester mapped - and a great idea for a fun, yet extremely academic, scavenger hunt about the presidency.

Disappointed today that my Academic Decathlon meeting attendance was just three. :( But, it has been a few years since it was at this school. And, all of the “extremely interested” kiddos are part of MANY different clubs and activities, so scheduling meetings and study groups will be a bit difficult. Persevering though!

I have started my “fun” bulletin board this year with “Be More Awesome” courtesy of our school’s yearly theme (from Kid President and the dreaded Lego Movie song!). I had the kiddos come up with several ideas on how they could be more awesome and had them each write one (graffiti board style) on the board.

My goal for this board is to change it up once a month - and use a movie/video tie-in. Why? Because I found one on Pinterest “Don’t be a cotton-headed ninny-muggins” from Elf, which will have several study tips. :) Idea here.

So, do you have any suggestions on clever sayings from some other shows/movies? I am partial to The Office, anything Pixar, Lost, Hocus Pocus, Prison Break, Breakfast Club, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Parks & Rec, and so many more! I want it to be readily recognizable to the students, so the more current the better, probably?

theallchemist:

hipsterlibertarian:

Unintentionally telling tweets are telling.

So now we see how we should view politicians who make statements that are weakly resistant to social problems… THEY LYING that’s why the stance is so weak…. Takes me back to Obama’s “If I had a son, he would look like Trayvon.”

hmmmm

theallchemist:

hipsterlibertarian:

Unintentionally telling tweets are telling.

So now we see how we should view politicians who make statements that are weakly resistant to social problems… THEY LYING that’s why the stance is so weak…. Takes me back to Obama’s “If I had a son, he would look like Trayvon.”

hmmmm

(via hipsterenglishteacher)

ambedu:

Aw

Who could ever be that mean to that face???

(Source: nolannorths)

Close your eyes.
From Hook to Jumanji to Dead Poet’s Society
With wonder and fantasy and passion
Your joy became watercolor poetry that filled
in the sun and made people everywhere
believe in themselves and believe in life.
We’ve seen you weep and stand on a desk to view the world differently.
We’ve seen you fight for what you wanted and desired.
Maybe these were just characters, but you brought them to life.
I don’t know your middle name or your wife’s name or how you felt the first moment you realized you were famous or the first time you felt alive,
but I know you were sixty-three when you felt the desks collapse and
the walls close in and suddenly we remembered you were fighting a battle, too.
Suddenly we feel an absence we hadn’t felt before.
Suddenly we feel a sadness we do not know how to describe.
We’re all fighting battles and we realize that with your passing
and we’re sorry you had to leave.
You made us laugh and you made us weep and you made
us stand in our movie theatre seats and raise our fists to a life worth living.
OH CAPTAIN, MY CAPTAIN, we will remember you.